Tuesday, April 5, 2016

As the Nation waits for Wisconsin's Voting Results...

Robbins

Actor Tim Robbins (who played Andy Dufresne in "The Shawkshank Redemption"), while stumping for Bernie Sanders in Wisconsin, said:

"After the Southern primaries, [the media] had called the election. And who's fooling who? Winning South Carolina in the Democratic primary is about as significant as winning Guam. No Democrat is going to win in the general election. Why do these victories have so much significance?"

While winning South Carolina is much more significant than winning Guam (delegate-wise in the Democratic primary), the Washington Post, in defending Hillary Clinton's Southern Black votes, actually makes the case that without them, she wouldn't be winning in the delegate count right now. (The readers comments are informative as well.)

As the WaPo also noted, winning Wisconsin would give Bernie Sanders a fresh dose of momentum — and perhaps new credibility for his claim that he can catch Clinton in the delegate count and win the Democratic nomination. Sanders’s unexpected staying power has unnerved some of Clinton’s supporters. In a memo sent out to backers Monday evening, Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook sounded aggravated:

"Hillary Clinton has built a nearly insurmountable lead among both delegates and actual voters. Contrary to the claims of the Sanders campaign, in measure after measure, Clinton has shown the broadest support of any candidate currently running for president. We know that the misleading spin will continue, but we wanted you to know the facts about the real state of the Democratic primary."

Mook said Sanders would have to win by overwhelming margins the four biggest delegate prizes left, including Clinton’s home state of New York to erase the front-runner’s lead. He did not mention Wisconsin.

The Clinton campaign also sent out a fundraising email Monday, saying: “We’re down in almost every poll in Wisconsin — tomorrow’s primary is going to be a tough fight. This nomination isn’t locked up yet, and we’ve got to keep fighting for every vote."

As of this post, Bernie Sanders has out-raised more than Hillary Clinton for the 3rd consecutive month:

Clooney

While Hillary Clinton was panhandling for campaign donations in New York, her husband Bill remained in Wisconsin and told a crowd of about 400 people at the Turner Hall Ballroom in downtown Milwaukee:

"She'd be the best president. She's always been a change-maker. And she's always been a leader. This is not about new vs. old or establishment vs. reform," he said, ticking off a long list of individuals and organizations that have supported the former New York senator and secretary of state. "They're in the change business, and they know she's always been there."

Hillary Clinton campaigned fewer days and before smaller crowds in Wisconsin than Sanders, turning much of her attention to the larger stakes in New York. Clinton did not mention the Wisconsin race during a rally Monday in Manhattan, but following Bernie's lead, Hillary Clinton had linked herself to New York raising minimum wage to $15 an hour.

On the eve of the Wisconsin primary, while Hillary Clinton was in NYC, Sanders touted his long-standing support for labor unions and his opposition to a series of disastrous trade deals, setting a contrast with Clinton that he’s pressed in other industrial Midwestern states:

"I am not a candidate who goes to the unions, goes to workers, then leaves and goes to a fundraiser on Wall Street. I’m glad that she’s going around the country talking about the need for more manufacturing. Well that’s a great idea, but maybe she should have been there 20 or 30 years ago when we started hemorrhaging manufacturing jobs in this country largely because of the disastrous trade policy."

The Washington Post noted that Clinton "has received more endorsements from labor unions than her rival for the Democratic presidential nomination", but they failed to mention that those endorsements came from the union's leadership, not from the rank-and-file members (Yuge difference!)

Hillary Clinton had previously said that Sanders seems to pride himself on having “opposed all trade deals, all the time. "But I don’t think that’s right,” Clinton said, because when it's “done right” trade arrangements can benefit American workers. She supported the TPP trade deal — that's been described as "NAFTA on steroids" — 45 times, saying it was "the gold standard" of all trade deals, before following Sanders' lead in also opposing it.

Clinton

At a rally in Wisconsin, Bernie told his supporters: “If we win here, we’re going to have a bounce going into New York state, where I think we can win. If we win in New York state — between you and me, I don’t want to get Hillary Clinton more nervous than she already is, so don’t tell her this — but I think if we win here, we win in New York state, we’re on our way to the White House."

A desperate Hillary Clinton is trying harder than ever to cast Sanders as a gun-loving NRA ally. While in Albany, she told a small group of New York Democratic lawmakers, lobbyists and other party stalwarts in the ballroom of a swanky hotel, that the guns used by New York criminals come across the border from Bernie's home State of Vermont.

* Also see my posts about New York:

FYI: Tax Returns for Clinton vs. Bernie in 2014

Clinton --> $28,336,212
http://www.taxhistory.org/thp/presreturns.nsf/Returns/07E13291870D475885257E93007B1015/$file/HR_Clinton_2014.pdf

Bernie --> $205,167
http://www.taxhistory.org/thp/presreturns.nsf/Returns/9900B87E8AE6AF0C85257EB4004E9F66/$file/B_Sanders_2014.pdf

3 comments:

  1. Wisconsin exit polls:

    As in previous Democratic contests, Sanders ran very strongly among younger voters, while Clinton did better among those over 45.

    Clinton and Sanders ran about even among primary voters who said they think of themselves as Democrats but Sanders had a big lead among independents voting in the Democratic primary (71 percent Sanders to 28% Clinton).

    In hypothetical November matchups of Trump versus Clinton or Cruz versus Clinton, only a small number of Republican primary voters said they would vote for Clinton (6 percent for Cruz versus Clinton and 10 percent for Trump versus Clinton). Larger numbers in both cases (about 18 percent) said they would consider voting for a third party candidate. (Say Bernie Sanders's name you ass!)

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/what-exit-polls-say-about-how-ted-cruz-and-bernie-sanders-won-wisconsin-primary/

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  2. Some more exit polls from Wisconsin election (Spoiler alert!!! Bernie rocks!!!)

    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/live-democratic-primary-exit-poll-analysis/story?id=38163893

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  3. UPDATE!!!

    Bernie Sanders vs. Hillary Clinton in 3 Simple Charts.

    http://goo.gl/Cacvj7

    ReplyDelete